Reconciliation Policy

Our Reconciliation Policy (pdf, 2MB), accessible version (doc, 52KB), is our commitment to respect, recognise and build relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and encourage others in our community to do the same.

It was endorsed in November 2015 and builds on our previous Reconciliation Policy (2010-2014), focusing on continuing our reconciliation journey. It was developed in consultation with Wurundjeri Council, our community and staff. The policy includes:

  • our Statement of Commitment to Wurundjeri people and to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • our Reconciliation Policy commitments
  • our protocols for recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The policy will be implemented through action plans, the first of these being the Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18 (doc, 23KB).

For more information on the policy, contact our Social Planning and Wellbeing team on 9243 8888.

Reconciliation events in 2018

Take part in a range of events in Moonee Valley throughout 2018 - see our reconciliation calendar.

Statement of Commitment

Statement of Commitment (pdf, 3.45MB) to the Wurundjeri People and to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Wanganyinu ngarr-gu Wurundjeri Gulinj ngargunin twarn biik wenerop Moonee Valley dharri, wanganyinu gahgook Nanggit baambuth ba yalingbu[1].

We acknowledge the Wurundjeri People as the Traditional Custodians of the Country on which Moonee Valley is located, we pay our respects to Elders past and present.

This Statement of Commitment was updated in 2017 and reaffirms the partnership between Moonee Valley City Council and Wurundjeri Council and renews our commitment to the Wurundjeri People and to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Respect - Gahgook

Moonee Valley City Council respects:

  • the Wurundjeri People as the first Australians on this land
  • the unique status of Aboriginal Peoples as the original custodians of traditional lands and waters
  • the special and distinctive spiritual and material relationship that Aboriginal Peoples have with the land, water, trees, rocks, hills and valley creeks, rivers and flood plains of the Moonee Valley area
  • the value of the diversity and strength of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and cultures to the heritage of all Australians.

Recognition - Ngarngaith

Moonee Valley City Council recognises:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as having a distinct culture, history and legacy with vibrancy, diversity and richness that all Australians can share in
  • the unique spirit and contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and the richness of traditional Indigenous languages
  • the historical and environmental importance of the significant and sacred sites, and special places within the city
  • the past injustices inflicted on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities by this and previous generations of non-Aboriginal Australians, and expresses our profound regret that these injustices occurred. In particular, Council is sorry for the forced removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, confiscation of their traditional lands, the implementation of policies designed to extinguish Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander practices, language and culture and for the pain these actions have caused and continue to cause the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Relationships - Djerri

Moonee Valley City Council will advocate for:

  • respect towards and recognition of the contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to Australian society, past and present
  • the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples
  • increased opportunities and self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples
  • the sustainability of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and programs.

[1] This acknowledgement has been written in Woi wurrung – the language of the Wurundjeri People.

Nhanbu Gurru Festival

Celebrate Wurundjeri culture at our Nhanbu Gurru (meaning ‘ancient flower’ in Woi wurrung) Festival! The event will take place at the Babepal Paen-mirring (‘Mother’s tear’) ceremonial rock circle, a site of Aboriginal significance and a meeting place for the whole community.

To follow on from our Walk with Wurundjeri event in March where the community helped us plant the Murnong (yam daisy), we’re inviting you back for a celebration of Wurundjeri culture and to help us harvest the plant.

There’ll be a smoking ceremony, talks with elders, traditional dancing and music, a BBQ and children’s activities.

You’ll also learn about the significance of the Murnong and its future in Moonee Valley.

When: Sunday, 7 October 2018, 11am–2pm

Where: Five Mile Creek Reserve, Government Road, Essendon

RSVP: mvcc.vic.gov.au/enviroevents

Located along the Moonee Ponds Creek Trail, you can walk or ride to the event. The event is also walking distance from public transport, including the Glenbervie and Strathmore train stations, and Buses 510 and 512.

The rock circle recently won a Highly Commended award in the Local Government category of this year’s HART (Helping Achieve Reconciliation Together) Awards, presented by Reconciliation Victoria and the Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA) to acknowledge Victorian initiatives that contribute to local reconciliation outcomes.

Ceremonial rock circle at Five Mile Creek Reserve

Our new ceremonial rock circle (called Babepal Paen-mirring, meaning “Mother’s tear” in Woi wurrung) at Five Mile Creek Reserve has received a Highly Commended Award in the Local Government category of this year’s HART Awards.

The HART Awards are presented by Reconciliation Victoria in partnership with the Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA) and acknowledge Victorian initiatives that contribute to local reconciliation outcomes.

The site on which the rock circle sits recognises a registered site of Aboriginal significance and protects artefacts scattered at the site. After consulting with the Wurundjeri Land Council and the Wurundjeri Narrap team, it was decided to place rocks in the shape of an eye so that the tears of Mother Earth could flow down into Five Mile Creek. The rocks were placed in groups of three representing the three main family groups of the Wurundjeri.

The site is managed by Wurundjeri Elder Uncle David Wandin and the Narrap team and we were very proud to have them out at Five Mile Creek for our Walk with Wurundjeri event to launch the ceremonial rock circle on Sunday, 25 March. The local community was out in force to learn about Wurundjeri, take part in activities and planting, and help us in our mission to reintroduce the Murnong (yam daisy) and other native plants to the area. Check out this video from the day:

The site is an important part of a broader approach to educate our community about the significance of this area to the Wurundjeri People, and there will be plenty of opportunities to hold ceremonies and demonstrations of Wurundjeri life in the future, with another event already planned in October.

It also acts on a commitment in our Reconciliation Policy to invite and partner with the Wurundjeri Council for environmental activities, events and land management projects, while also promoting reconciliation through respect, recognition and relationship-building and encouraging others to do the same. 

Recognition plaques

In December 2015 we made our ongoing commitment to respect, recognise and build relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples more visible with the installation of new recognition plaques.

These beautiful plaques are now displayed on over 40 Council buildings including the Civic Centre, Transfer Station, libraries, community centres and leisure centres.

Recognition plaque which reads "We acknowledge the Wurundjeri poeople as the Traditional Custodians of the country on which the City of Moonee Valley is located, and we pay our respects to their Elders past and present"

They proudly acknowledge the Wurundjeri people as the traditional custodians of the land now known as Moonee Valley, and pay respect to Wurundjeri elders past and present. The artwork titled ‘The Myth of the Rainbow’ by Wurundjeri artist Judy Nicholson was commissioned especially for the project.

We are now encouraging local businesses and the community to follow by displaying the acknowledgement on their own premises. If you’re interested in displaying a recognition sticker, please contact our Social Planning and Wellbeing team on 9243 8888 or email community@mvcc.vic.gov.au.

Western Regional Local Government Reconciliation Network

We are a member of the Western Regional Local Government Reconciliation Network (WRLGRN). The network consists of five other local councils who meet bi-monthly to address the needs and issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the western region.

Close the Gap

Close the Gap is a national initiative to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country.

We are a member of the Inner North West Primary Care Partnership (INWPCP) Close the Health Gap, Wellbeing Partnership. The partnership brings together health and welfare organisations in the local government areas of Moonee Valley, Moreland, Melbourne and Yarra.

The partnership is guided by an action plan which focuses on cultural understanding; create welcoming environments; asking the Indigenous status question and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff in liaison roles. Further information is available the INWPCP website.

To find out more about national Close the Gap initiative, visit the Oxfam website.

Our Wurundjeri history

You can read about Moonee Valley's Wurundjeri history, including the significance of certain sites and the origins of names.

Last updated: Wednesday, 5 September 2018, 5:21 AM